Dementia Awareness Week: Remember The Person

on Tuesday, 22 May 2012. Posted in N21 Community, N21 Experts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 A diagnosis of dementia is often unexpected and it is usually a worrying and distressing time. It is hard for the person being diagnosed but often even more difficult for family and friends. People generally need a great deal of reassurance and support. There are usually lots of questions that need answering and it can be a bewildering time. The good news is that there is much that people can do in the early stages that can help to make life easier and more enjoyable, both now and in the future. There is often lack of information regarding this illness and it helps to have a basic understanding of the condition.

 

Dementia is the term that describes a set of symptoms which include loss of memory, mood changes, and problems with communication and reasoning. These symptoms occur when the brain is damaged by certain diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and damage caused by a series of small strokes. There is sometimes confusion around Alzheimer's disease and its relationship with dementia. Often people think these are two separate conditions. Alzheimer's disease is in fact the most common type of dementia. About 60 per cent of people in the UK who have dementia have Alzheimer's disease. During the course of the disease the chemistry and structure of the brain change, leading to the death of brain cells. Problems of short-term memory are usually the first noticeable sign. A GP will usually refer a patient to a specialist and once a diagnosis is made then there should be consideration given by the health care professionals regarding the prescription of drugs.

 

Drug treatments cannot provide a cure for dementia. However, drug treatments have been developed that can temporarily slow down the progression of symptoms in some people. It is important that the family carer does not undertake the entire responsibility of caring and supporting their loved one. When people do not have a break the person caring can become impatient, frustrated, depressed and generally worn out. There is help available with practical tasks as well as emotional support. The Alzheimer's Society can provide support in many ways, from fact sheets through to family support groups, help lines and forums. Sometimes it helps just talking to other family carers who are going through similar types of problems.

 

At Home Care Preferred we employ caregivers who can provide invaluable care and support. It is important that the family carer has a break from their day to day routine and our flexible approach means we can input support on an ad-hoc basis when required. Some clients use our services a few times a week which enables the family carer to have some time to themselves. Other clients require more regular support. We find that assistance from our care team first thing in the morning gives the family carer a good start to the day. Whilst our caregiver is helping the client the family member has the chance to sort out their own needs. Sometimes an hour or two of help can make such a difference to those caring for people with dementia. Some families opt for live-in care and this can be a positive alternative to residential care. Generally, people with dementia are happier and less disorientated when they are in their own familiar surroundings.

 

At Home Care Preferred we usually start by meeting the family. At this time we learn a lot about the challenges the family are facing. Together we look at developing a viable solution. Within a few weeks of our team being in place it is rewarding to see the difference this support can make to the family. Anyone who would like an informal conversation or meeting with Home Care Preferred can contact either Ken Waterhouse on 020 8364 3670 or visit 49, Station Road, Winchmore Hill, London N21 3NB. Home Care Preferred can also send or email free fact sheets about dementia.

 

For free, full length fact sheets about dementia please contact: Ken Waterhouse Home Care Preferred 49 Station Rd Winchmore Hill London N21 3NB Tel: 020 8364 3670 Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

www.homecarepreferred.com


 

A diagnosis of dementia is often unexpected and it is usually a worrying and distressing time. It is hard for the person being diagnosed but often even more difficult for family and friends. People generally need a great deal of reassurance and support. There are usually lots of questions that need answering and it can be a bewildering time. The good news is that there is much that people can do in the early stages that can help to make life easier and more enjoyable, both now and in the future.

A diagnosis of dementia is often unexpected and it is usually a worrying and distressing time. It is hard for the person being diagnosed but often even more difficult for family and friends. People generally need a great deal of reassurance and support. There are usually lots of questions that need answering and it can be a bewildering time.

A diagnosis of dementia is often unexpected and it is usually a worrying and distressing time. It is hard for the person being diagnosed but often even more difficult for family and friends. People generally need a great deal of reassurance and support. There are usually lots of questions that need answering and it can be a bewildering time.

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